Author Archives: Amy Zipperer

Asparagus evolution.

   

Please don’t

tell the flowers — they think the sun loves them. The grass is under the same simple-minded impression about the rain, the fog, the dew — and when the wind blows, it feels so good they lose control of themselves and swobtoggle wildly around, bumping accidentally into their slender neighbors. Forgetful little lotus-eaters, solar-powered hydroholics, […]

Weeds, please.

Long rainy days have soaked into parched garden beds and it seems that if a person was still for a bit, it would be possible to witness the rapid growth. Still, though, we wait for the big harvests of late summer. We’re nibbling lettuces, turnip greens, arugula, and herbs. But the weeds win the prize […]

Baby, you can never hold back spring.

Maybe we did need need to wear scarves and layers of wool to keep warm while planting Cornelian cherry and hawthorn trees on this mid-May day, but the asparagus is undeterred. These purple-topped little darlings were planted from crowns buried in a deep furrow last spring. As tempting as they may be, the experts say […]

Hedging Our Bets

Here in the bleak midwinter, garlic waits patiently beneath the snow, cilantro and dill seeds bide their time, blueberry bushes rest. It’s not such a bleak midwinter after all. The ice shimmers and shines, gulls wait on chimneys against the bluest skies, and lists of ideas, of things yet to come, grow longer by the […]

Still growing…

New England’s whirlwind summer has passed us by and we’re preparing to plant our garlic bulbs and tuck in for the cold months ahead. Gardens at the Eastport school and Labor of Love Food Pantry have continued to expand and we’re looking forward to more growth next year. Check out http://kgi.org/labor-love-victory-garden for an overview of […]

Winter

After a plentiful cherry tomato and cucumber harvest in August, we wrapped up the school gardening season with garlic planting in November. We’re hopeful that it will prove to be a deer-resistant hardy crop. As winter solstice nears, I’m cozying up with my just arrived Fedco seed catalog and planning for spring. In the meantime, […]

Summertime’s Progress

This is what July looks like in the school gardens… A miniature forest of unruly tomato plants sprawls in one of our raised beds. Students can look forward to an ample harvest of cherry tomatoes when they return in early September. The raspberry bed planted in spring now includes squash, red clover, calendula, borage, lemon […]

Altering the landscape: Raspberries for everyone.

Donning gloves and warm outerwear, a lively bunch braved the chilly late April winds to plant raspberries today. As the weather (hopefully) warms in a few more weeks, an herbaceous layer of tender perennials and annual crops started indoors will be planted among the trees and berry bushes. Bare-root everbearing raspberry plants soak in buckets […]

Hello, cotyledons. We’re so glad to see you.

As the embryonic seed leaves of Calendula officinalis show themselves, the growing season seems to have arrived at last. These cotyledons have photosynthesized above the soil’s surface to supply nourishment to the seedling until the plant’s first true leaves appear. At that time, the seedlings will need to be transplanted into a nutritious growing medium […]